Girl Be Heard and AntiquityNOW present Generations: Voices of Women From Antiquity to Modern Day

AN News GreyIn association with AntiquityNOW, Girl Be Heard will be presenting Generations on Wednesday, October 22 at 6:30 pm at the East 4th Street Theatre, 83 East 4th Street, New York, NY as part of their workshop series for the 2014-15 theater season. Generations is being performed during the Estrogenius Festival 2014.

Generations is an ensemble performance devised by Girl Be Heard Company Members in collaboration with women and girls, ages 17 to 61.  This is the first show in Girl Be Heard’s history that has brought together women of all ages to research, discuss and write about women across history.  This inter-generational laboratory reveals stories of resiliency, both personal and historic.

GBHGirl Be Heard uses theater as a vehicle to empower young women to become brave, confident, socially conscious leaders and explore their own challenging circumstances. GBH believes that if a girl can change her own life, she can change the lives of girls everywhere. Girl Be Heard creates a world for young women to find strength, realize their potential, and rise above their circumstances and society’s expectations of them.

AntiquityNOW’s mission is to illustrate the connections between the past and modern times in order to reveal how ancient legacies continue to have resonance today.  Generations will demonstrate how women’s changing—and sometimes unchanging—roles through history raise profound questions of equality, social standing and human rights.  What better way to explore this than through the contemporary voices of young girls and women valiantly striving each day to break barriers and forge their own destinies—voices that echo those of the many remarkable women of distant ages.

For more information about Generations and the GBH 2014-15 season, and to purchase tickets, go to http://girlbeheard.org/shows/schedule-tickets/

Don’t Miss Out! Second Call for Entries for 2015 LegacyQuest International Film and Video Festival for Tweens

Letter of Intent Deadline- December 12, 2014

Final Entry Submission Deadline- February 27, 2015

View our invitational video below and scroll down for details about the festival and how your students can get involved!



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AntiquityNOW (AN) and Archaeological Legacy Institute (ALI) announce a call for entries for the 2015 LegacyQuest International Children’s Film and Video Festival. Held in conjunction with The Archaeology Channel’s (TAC) International Film and Video Festival, May 15-19, 2015 in Eugene, Oregon, the LegacyQuest festival invites young learners to explore how the ancient past influences their lives today through visual storytelling. The competition is open to students between the ages of 12 and 15 (6th – 8th grades) in the United States and abroad. To be eligible for consideration, films must be five minutes in length, produced in 2014 or 2015 and focus on subject matter related to antiquity’s legacy. Continue reading

Bon Appetit Wednesday! Tempura Fried Maple Leaves

maple-leaves-61798_640They’re everywhere! Autumn leaves are falling, falling, falling and collecting in great, heaping, colorful piles all over lawns, roofs, streets and sidewalks. Beautiful and vibrant for sure, but what to do with so many little pieces of autumn? Most of the time we just bag them up and throw them away, but today we’re giving you another option. Courtesy of Japan, we bring you Fried Maple Leaves! There are accounts that these leaves have been eaten for thousands of years in Japan, but since tempura only arrived in the 16th century, the truth is they’ve probably been around for a little over 500 years. We’re bringing you an updated modern version created by James Wong, a chef who wanted to try the treat, but was nowhere near Japan. His version is made with maple leaves, pumpkin and fig. Continue reading

AntiquityNOW Introduces the Education Topic Matrix

Education Topic Matrix FinalAntiquityNOW is pleased to announce the launch of our Education Topic Matrix, an index of content for educators to use as supplements to their classroom curricula. This matrix includes all our blog posts, Kids’ Blog posts, educational projects, videos, creative writing, arts and crafts, curricula as well as our partner projects, organized by region and era. It’s cross-indexed, covers a wide variety of subjects, is easy to search and is organized under headings that teachers can readily recognize.  And the best part? It’s completely free. Continue reading

In Praise of Teachers—4,000 Years of Preparing the Next Generation

dPIAUPDATE! This post was originally published on May 7, 2013.  As long as humans have existed, people have learned from one another. It’s in our DNA. This is the genetic matrix upon which great civilizations evolved and centers of knowledge arose. For those who become the teachers, they take on the mantle of an ancient and noble art. AntiquityNOW is an enthusiastic supporter of teachers and their contributions through the often tumultuous but ever intriguing course of history. In that spirit we will be announcing on Tuesday, October 14 a very special resource tool specifically designed for teachers that can help them demonstrate to their students how the ancient past is not as distant as they may think. Stay tuned!

For more about inspiring and influential educators throughout history, check out our slideshow celebrating World Teachers’ Day 2013.

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Who was your favorite teacher or professor?  Can you still remember his or her lectures, an activity you did in class, a lesson that changed the way you think about the world?  Great teachers make an indelible mark on their students and are often remembered long after those students leave the classroom.  In honor of Teacher Appreciation Day, we take a look back at some of antiquity’s greatest educators and how we continue to use their teachings and methods today. Continue reading

Bon Appetit Wednesday! Easy, No-Bake Cookies with Quinoa, the Incas’ “Mother of all Grains”

1024px-QuinuaLast week we celebrated ancient amaranth, superfood of the Aztecs. So this week we decided to explore another ancient “grain” that sustained a great civilization. Quinoa was to the Incas what amaranth was to the Aztecs: a source of strength and life. And just like amaranth, quinoa isn’t really a grain at all. It is a seed from a plant in the goosefoot family, and along with amaranth and buckwheat is often called a “pseudocereal” because it is grown for use as a grain.[1] Let’s take a trip through quinoa’s history before indulging in a delectable recipe for easy, gluten-free, dairy-free, No-Bake Quinoa Cookies. Continue reading

KIDS’ BLOG! Take a Trip Through an Ancient Roman Kitchen

KitchenWhat would it be like to cook and eat in an ancient Roman kitchen?  Would there even be a stove or an oven?  Did these ancient people have any way to keep their food cold?  Did they have a sink or running water?

Archaeologists, led by Professor Jeroen Poblome, digging at a site in Turkey, have discovered a nearly 2,000 year old kitchen in the ruins of the ancient Roman city of Sagalassos.  Originally part of the expanded Roman Empire, this city is located in the southwestern part of today’s Turkey.  Professor Marc Waelkens and his team from Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium had been digging in this site since 1990, painstakingly uncovering the hidden city.   Poblome’s team has joined them, and the archaeologists were delighted this summer to uncover a kitchen dating as early as 200 CE.[1] Continue reading

Roman Gladiators: How They Compare to Modern Sporting Heroes

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UPDATE!  This post was originally published on April 4th, 2013. American football season is in full swing and the players are back in the news for their behavior on and off the field. As the NFL grapples with scandal, the game goes on and fans all over the country are gathering each week, suiting up in their best team apparel, breaking out the tailgate, switching on the big screen or even traveling to the stadium to cheer on their favorite players and teams. We thought this would be a perfect time to republish this post about the similarities between our modern sporting celebrities and the ancient heroes of the gladiatorial games. You’ll be amazed to learn how much our modern athletes have in common with their ancient counterparts. And don’t miss Part 1 of this 2-part series, Super Bowl XLVII and the Superstars of Ancient Rome, which illuminates even more fascinating comparisons. Continue reading

Bon Appetit Wednesday! Popping Up Some Ancient Amaranth

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Image credit: Kurt Stüber [1] – caliban.mpiz-koeln.mpg.de/mavica/index.html part of http://www.biolib.de

Today’s recipe is for 5-Minute Amaranth Popcorn—a nutritional, gluten-free snack food to accompany a rousing ballgame or a family movie night. It’s so scrumptiously delicious it will fool even the most hard-core popcorn devotees! The best part about this recipe is that it features one of history’s greatest plants. Popularly referred to as a grain, amaranth is not actually a grain at all. It is a seed from a non-grass family of plants and is often grouped together with other pseudograins such as buckwheat and quinoa. It takes its name from the Greek word amarantos, which aptly means “one that does not whither” or “never fading.”[1] Continue reading

Celebrating National Coffee Day: A Jittery Goat, Political Plots, Slave Labor, Grounds for Divorce—The Coffee Bean Brews Up a Tumultuous World History

The inimitable coffee bean. Lusciously colored, smooth, glistening, fragrant. It’s a devilish addiction shared by millions of people throughout history. But aside from its robust flavor and energized boost, the bean has given us a history that is eye-opening and colorful, just like the bean itself.  Let’s take a step back in time and review a few facts drawn from the nefarious and splendiferous legacy of this enduring brew.

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