2013 Winners of The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival

TAC IFVFIn our last blog post we told you about this year’s big winner at The Archaeology Channel’s International Film and Video FestivalThe 2000 Year Old Computer took top honors in both the juried competition as well as the audience vote.  However, this wasn’t the only film to snag an award. The 2013 festival was full of amazing entries.  Here are a few of the winners in other categories:

Special Mention (by jury)- Iceman Murder Mystery

Best Narration (by jury)- Unburying the Past

Best Animation and Effects (by jury)- Mysteries of the Ancient Architects

Best Script and Best Music (by jury)- “I Remember, I Believe

Best Cinematography (by jury)-  Ethiopia: In the Footsteps of the First Christians

At AntiquityNOW we believe education is key to preserving and protecting cultural heritage, so we would like to highlight this year’s Best Public Education Value (by jury) winner, Unburying the Past, a documentary about the archaeological heritage of Malaysia and how it links to the rest of the world.  Click below to watch a clip of this award-winning film.

“Malaysia’s archaeological heritage stretches back more than a million years. This ancient culture has attracted world attention in exhibitions abroad and in the media for the last two decades. Sites all over the country have revealed their ancient secrets, providing important evidence on Malaysia’s earliest habitation sites. This documentary explores Malaysia’s most important sites and their link to the rest of the world. It showcases Southeast Asia’s oldest nearly complete Paleolithic human skeleton, the iconic Perak Man, whose discovery also has caught the attention of medical archaeology as probably the earliest example of a congenital deformity. It also demonstrates how Malaysia has been connected over thousands of miles and thousands of years with other cultures in south and east Asia and the Pacific.”

Description from the International Film and Video Festival: “Malaysia’s archaeological heritage stretches back more than a million years. This ancient culture has attracted world attention in exhibitions abroad and in the media for the last two decades. Sites all over the country have revealed their ancient secrets, providing important evidence on Malaysia’s earliest habitation sites. This documentary explores Malaysia’s most important sites and their link to the rest of the world. It showcases Southeast Asia’s oldest nearly complete Paleolithic human skeleton, the iconic Perak Man, whose discovery also has caught the attention of medical archaeology as probably the earliest example of a congenital deformity. It also demonstrates how Malaysia has been connected over thousands of miles and thousands of years with other cultures in south and east Asia and the Pacific.”

Along with the festival, ALI also hosts The Archaeology Channel Conference on Cultural Heritage Film, which “promotes discussion and collaboration regarding the uses of cultural heritage film.”  Co-sponsored by the University of Oregon Department of Anthropology, the speakers at the conference “promote the creation, distribution and use of cultural heritage film as an influence for broad cultural awareness and encourage the exchange of new ideas and approaches to employ film for the common good of all humanity”.  The conference is reaching out to nations around the world.  Dr. Richard Pettigrew, Founder and President of the Archaeological Legacy Institute said,

“Our Conference on Cultural Heritage Film has become an increasingly important part of the Festival experience–and it grew again this year with representation from such countries as Malaysia, Pakistan, Macedonia, and Armenia, as well as eight US states.  Many people and organizations want to do a better job in developing and using media applications for public outreach about cultural heritage.”

AntiquityNOW is partnering with the Archaeological Legacy Institute, the organization behind The Archaeology Channel, to co-sponsor the first children’s film and video festival, premiering in May 2014 during AntiquityNOW Month.  Stay tuned to our website for more information on how to submit your own film!

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