In Case You Missed It…2013 Recipes With a Past!

Recipe Ebook Cover*Don’t miss our 2013 recipe book filled with delicious food from main courses to drinks and desserts.

Mario Batali, Martha Stewart, Rachael Ray, Julia Child…giants in culinary arts known for their expertise, personal franchises and larger than life personalities.  But they aren’t the only chefs known for their style.

How about those Babylonian epicures whose haute cuisine recipes date to c. 1750 BCE during the reign of Hammurabi?[1]

Ever see the culinary page-turner Hedypatheia (Pleasant Living or Life of Luxury), written around 350 BCE by Archestratus, a Sicilian Greek? [2]

ELABORATE THERMOSPODIUM A heater for the service of hot foods and drinks in the dining room. Hot drinks were mixed and foods were served from apparatus of this kind. The fuel was charcoal. There were public places, specializing in hot drinks, called Thermopolia. This specimen was found at Stabiæ, one of the ill-fated towns destroyed by eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Ntl. Mus., Naples, 72986; Field M., 24307.

ELABORATE THERMOSPODIUM
A heater for the service of hot foods and drinks in the dining room. This specimen was found at Stabiæ, one of the towns destroyed by eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Ntl. Mus., Naples, 72986; Field M., 24307.

If you want to read the Apicius, a collection of Roman recipes from the c. late 4th or early 5th century, go to the extraordinary translation by Joseph Dommers Vehling titled Cooking and Dining in Imperial Rome.

The first known cookbooks in Arabic were written by Ibn Sayyār al-Warrāq in the 10th century and offer a glimpse into life in Islam’s golden age.[3]  The court of Kublai Khan (1215 -94 CE) is preserved gastronomically—mostly in soup recipes—by its master chef Huou in his collection “The Important Things to Know About Eating and Drinking.”[4]

Forme of Cury Title Page

Forme of Cury Title Page

Have a hankering for porpoise porridge?  Crack open the Forme of Cury, the cookbook compiled by Richard II’s chef with dishes from more than 600 years ago in England.[5]

And now there’s another cookery tome to add to the bookshelf (virtual bookshelf—it’s the 21st century after all).  AntiquityNOW is proud to present its 2013 Recipes With a Past, a compendium of recipes published on www.antiquitynow.org this year.  Each dish has ancient roots, rendered for today’s discerning tastes.

Recipes With a Past commemorates those innovators of the past who have left their own culinary legacies for today’s tables.  These recipes reflect the great bounty of this earth and remind us to cherish and preserve our cultural heritage, in all its forms.  Please click here or on the cover page above to download and enjoy our e-book, Recipes With a Past.


1. http://www.library.yale.edu/neareast/exhibitions/cuisine.html

2. http://latis.exeter.ac.uk/classics/undergraduate/food3/archestratus.htm

3. http://www.carrotmuseum.co.uk/alwarraq.html

4. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/136079/cookbook#ref=ref26264

5. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1232527/Unveiled-Worlds-recipe-book-

6. shows-masterchefs-creating-600-YEARS-ago.html#ixzz2nmN52pO5

One response to “In Case You Missed It…2013 Recipes With a Past!

  1. Pingback: 2014 Recipes With a Past and the Art of Being Human | AntiquityNOW

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