Category Archives: Blog

Bon Appetit Wednesday! National Hot Dog Month

Hot_dog_with_mustardIt’s National Hot Dog Month and we can’t wait to celebrate! Hot dogs seem like such a modern invention, but of course, AntiquityNOW is here to bring you the history. And while we’re at it, we’re going to educate you on the sport that elevates the hot dog to a whole new level: the eating contest.

We don’t want to leave you with a whole new appreciation for the hot dog and no new way to enjoy it, so you’ll find a fabulous hot dog recipe at the end of the post.

Check out Bon Appetit Wednesday! A Roman Pig, Hot Dogs, Eating Contests and Four Patriots: Happy July 4th and start celebrating!

Throwback Thursday! Ancient Ways to Cool Off

summer sun blue skyIt’s hot out there, folks! In the northern hemisphere, we’re all searching for the best way to cool down. We turn to all of our modern techniques: air conditioning, electric fans, cooled swimming pools, ice packs and more. But did you know that the ancients had their own ways of cooling off? From fans to fountains and even the first air conditioner, antiquity never ceases to surprise and amaze. Check out our post, It’s Hot, Hot, Hot! Ancient Methods of Keeping It Cool,  for more fascinating info on the history of chilling out. Continue reading

Bon Appetit Wednesday! Cook the World’s Oldest Curry Recipe

curryThere are so many ancient dishes and ingredients that we eat every day and never consider the long and storied histories behind them. That’s why AntiquityNOW makes an effort to reveal the fascinating pasts of the foods we love. Two of our favorite ancient foods are curry and turmeric. Now you can learn how to cook the world’s oldest curry, which features turmeric in its ingredient list. The curry was discovered in 2010 by two Washington State University archaeologists who “used starch analysis to trace the world’s first-known or ‘oldest’ proto-curry of aubergine, ginger and turmeric from a shard of pottery found in the ancient Harappan civilisation near modern-day Delhi.”[1]

Cooking up this ancient dish is a great activity for the family. Immerse yourself in the food of an ancient culture. But before you fire up the stove, check out our posts on curry and turmeric. Then watch the video below and get cooking!

Oldest Curry

[1] How to cook the world’s oldest curry – BBC News. (n.d.). Retrieved July 04, 2016, from http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-36585926

Bon Appetit Wednesday! Enjoy an Ancient Picnic

Thomas Cole's "The Picnic."

Thomas Cole’s “The Picnic.”

July is National Picnic month and we can’t think of a better way to celebrate the beautiful summer (or winter if you’re in the southern hemisphere) weather than heading outside and enjoying a picnic inspired by antiquity. We’ve brought together some of our favorite Recipes With a Past that we think make a perfect picnic feast.

And of course, a picnic isn’t perfect without a beautiful setting in which to experience your delicious meal. Check out our post on Nature, Ecotherapy and a Peek into the Past Through National Parks to learn about the history of gardens, parks and natural public spaces. Maybe you’ll get a few ideas about where to stage your outing!

But first, the food!

Throwback Thursday! Perfectly Preserved Petroglyphs

Siberian petroglyphs. Image taken by Sergei Alkin.

Siberian petroglyphs. Image taken by Sergei Alkin.

It is said “a picture is worth a thousand words,” but some pictures are worth much more than that. Some ancient pictures are worth a thousand years of history and knowledge. These images tell stories about our ancestors and they help us to understand our past.

Recently, a fascinating find in Siberia was revealed for the first time and it provides a 4,000-year-old window into the ancient past. When scientists were alerted to its presence three years ago, they decided to keep it a secret in order to protect the site while they studied and cataloged its treasures. Now, for the first time, its location has been made public and our eager eyes can feast upon the perfectly preserved art. Continue reading

Bon Appetit Wednesday! Strange Recipes With a Past

Fish and vegetables hanging up in a cupboard, still-life. Mosaic, Roman artwork, 2nd century CE. From a villa at Tor Marancia, near the Catacombs of Domitilla.

Fish and vegetables hanging up in a cupboard, still-life. Mosaic, Roman artwork, 2nd century CE. From a villa at Tor Marancia, near the Catacombs of Domitilla.

Humans are culinary explorers, gastronomical adventurers, seekers of the perfect palate-pleasing feast. However, throughout our long and storied history, we have occasionally strayed down paths that some may say we never should have reconnoitered. A recent Mental Floss article delves into our more interesting foodie moments, some of which will not necessarily make you want to run straight to the kitchen. But before you check out the less-than-appetizing side of our dietary past, try a few of AntiquityNOWs wackier Recipes With a Past listed below. They are sure to please your sense of taste AND your thirst for adventure! Continue reading

Bon Appetit Wednesday! Celebrate AntiquityNOW Month with Crepes Suzette

crepes suzetteAh, Paris in spring. What could be more glorious? Strolling the boulevards abloom with horse chestnut trees. Taking a boat ride down the Seine. Climbing to the top of the Eiffel Tower or gazing rapturously at the Mona …. Wait a minute. What’s that delectable aroma? What are those people consuming with such gusto? Yes! Regard the street vendor deftly creating that culinary perfection. Lo and behold, it’s the inimitable crepe! Continue reading

May Is AntiquityNOW Month!

AN News Grey

May is a month of celebration for us at AntiquityNOW. This is the time we commemorate how the past is not as distant as we may think.

AN Month bigHere’s how we’ve previously described why we take a month each year to give special attention to the past:

During May we celebrate all things ancient, with a modern twist. From 2,000 year old nanotechnology to today’s supercomputers, from earliest chanted rituals to electronic bloviations, the arc of human history has been, shall we say, complicated. As sentient beings, we have constructed marvels in word and deed. We have also destroyed and obliterated that which we don’t understand and those we choose not to recognize. We strut, preen, cogitate, ruminate—we make an altogether spectacular tragicomedy as we shuffle along this mortal coil. Humans are a confounding lot who often are doomed to repeat the very histories we disregard. Here lies the fascination with looking to the past as it reflects our very modern sense of self.

Continue reading

Strata, Portraits of Humanity, Episode 18, “Historic Norwegian Farm” and “Mariana Islands Latte Stones, Episode 1”

StrataImage-webThis episode of Strata returns to a familiar theme:  what does legacy mean for a people, and how can it be preserved?

In the first video of this episode, we are introduced to the stream at the historic farm of Havrå that connects the mountain, the field and the fjord.  Havrå, whose history stretches back to the Bronze Age, is protected by the Norwegian government.  On the farm, the field and the old sharing of the cultivated land are still intact.  And though many of the ancient ways have changed, a deep sense of heritage and community remain. Our second offering looks at the megalithic ruins known as latte that symbolize the ancient culture of the Chamorro people of the Mariana Islands. Latte are stone pillars and capitals that supported houses in complex village systems until the late 1600s prior to massive societal change under Spanish rule.  In this video we explore how the Chamorro legacy was built, and how clues to the past have uncovered new mysteries yet to be solved. Part 1 of 2. Continue reading

Celebrate Earth Day!

The photo was taken by the crew of Apollo 17 on their way to the Moon. Antarctica, Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Madagascar, and part of Asia are visible.

The photo was taken by the crew of Apollo 17 on their way to the Moon. Antarctica, Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Madagascar, and part of Asia are visible.

Today is Earth Day. It’s a time to celebrate the glorious bounty of this planet, which despite hurtling through a hostile and unforgiving universe, has nonetheless fostered an abundance of life for millions of years. Quite an accomplishment. Continue reading